Le groupe lactalisA GLOBAL COMPANY WITH A PASSION FOR UK DAIRY

Lactalis cheese making

Cheese remains the Company’s core business and the sector where it continues to lead, accounting for over 34% of Company turnover. Lactalis values and respects the unique heritage of each product in its own right, and always promotes the notion of “terroir” and local tradition.

Since 1933, Group Lactalis has contributed to promoting the French know how and gastronomy beyond its borders by exporting its cheeses and, in particular, the Président® brand, which is today sold in 160 countries. Lactalis is also the biggest manufacturer of AOC (Appellation d’Origine Controlee) cheeses in the World.

Cheese quality and texture

 

Classification of cheese is usually based on firmness. We classify cheese in the following way: Fresh, Soft Rinded, Semi-Hard and Hard Pressed, Blue-Veined, and Other.

There are other factors that will impact the quality, texture and eating experience of a cheese. These can be:

  • Milk Type: cow’s milk, goat’s milk, sheep’s milk, or buffalo milk or mix
  • Milk source: Organic or non-organic
  • Whether the milk is pasteurised or unpasteurised
  • How long a cheese is matured for
  • Whether some ingredients have been added during the cheesemaking process e.g. herbs or fruit
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CHEESE HAS AN EXCELLENT NUTRITIONAL VALUE:

1oz. (28g) hard cheese and 1/3 pint (200ml) milk contain equal amounts of Protein and Calcium

 

FRESH

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SOFT MOULD RIPENED

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SEMI-hard & hard pressed

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blue-veined

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Other

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the history of cheese

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Cheese is one of the most ancient forms of manufactured food, dating back to around 3,000BC.

There is evidence of cheese making among the earliest civilisations, with references appearing in ancient Sumerian writing, the Old Testament and classical Greek literature.

The remains of cheese making equipment have been found in Egypt and in Europe.

HOW CHEESE IS MADE

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It all starts with our farmers. Their understanding of local dairy traditions means one thing: World-class produce, every time.

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Our distribution network across the UK takes care of delivering the raw milk for the next stage of the process.

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Once at the factory, we add starter cultures and enzymes to the milk for the right structure and flavour.

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Salt is added to the curds and whey to help with the maturation of the cheese.

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Next, we drain the cheese and leave it to settle under its own weight. As a result, tiny holes may form in the cheese.

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At this point, we may press the cheese, to produce a cheddar or emmental, or we may leave the curds to drain to deliver a brie or camembert.

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The final ingredient is time. Once the cheese is perfectly matured, we package it in the appropriate format.

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It’s then ready to be eaten.

how TO SERVE CHEESE

Always Serve Cheese at Room Temperature

Bringing the cheese to room temperature before serving allows for the natural flavours and fragrances of the cheese to come out.  To best enjoy a cheese, bring it to room temperature at least 20 minutes before serving.

Always Leave the rind on

Whether you want to eat it or not, a cheese always presents better on a cheeseboard with its rind on.  Most rinds are edible, apart from ones made of wax as found coating Edam or Gouda!

Use one knife per cheese served

Cheese knives are all designed for specific cheese types.  The typical cheese knife with a fork on the end allows for cutting and serving using the same knife.  Using one knife per cheese served avoids any blue getting mixed up with your brie or cheddar!

Cut your cheese the right way

As cheese is a natural product, how it is cut allows for an even better experience as this brings out its natural flavours in the best way.

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Milk types used in cheese manufacture

How much milk is required for 250g of Cheese?

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